The Hunger Strike May Be Over, but the Conversation Around Police Violence Is Still Starved

By Joe Eskenazi : modernluxury – excerpt

Say what you will about the Frisco Five, who, after 17 days, called off a hunger strike that inspired hundreds of protesters to storm City Hall and berate public officials on multiple occasions. But you can’t say these aren’t brave people, with no shortage of tenacity and fortitude. And you can’t accuse them of being unfocused. Their demands were the ouster of Police Chief Greg Suhr and/or the resignation of Mayor Ed Lee. And in that they’ve refused to waver, even when traditional political allies urged them to think bigger.

Now the protesters have announced a press conference at 10:30 a.m. on Thursday at 17th and Valencia Streets to, ostensibly, answer the question of what comes next. It will be intriguing to see where this nascent movement chooses to go: Will it use its leverage and sense of moral urgency to push through long-sought, tangible reforms? Or will it, like so many prior efforts, gallop headlong into the windmill and disintegrate, having failed to accomplish much other than retaining ideological purity?

The conversations about how to change the rules and training so that police no longer cavalierly gun down suspects not possessing firearms—and routinely escape punishment when they do—are overdue. There’s a vital discussion to be had. But, outside the realm of technocrats, we’re not having it. In this city, the conversation around police use of force has been starved, too… (more)

Since this article was written, at least four Supervisors have called for the resignation of Chief Suhr after seeing the results of the year long independent inquiry into the the City’s troubled police department that was launched by District Attorney George Gascon. The Chief is responsible for his department and he has lost the trust of the community he serves. There appears to be no oversight and no accountability.

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