a step toward saving the Mission

By Tim Redmond : 48hills – excerpt

Sup. Hillary Ronen has introduced legislation that might make some impact on the dramatic gentrification of the Valencia Street corridor and surrounding areas and the displacement of long-time neighborhood businesses by high-end restaurants and brewpubs.

The measure would require conditional-review permits for new restaurants and would ban new brewpubs in the area roughly bounded by 14thStreet, Guerrero, Cezar Chavez, and Potrero.

Ronen also wants to block the merger of ground-floor commercial spaces resulting in spaces larger than 1,500 feet (except for legacy business, arts, and community uses). And she would require than any new developments of more than 10,000 square feet provide storefront space of less than 1,500 square feet.

Light industrial use would be legal in most areas, and a conditional-use hearing would be required if any legacy business is replaced…(more)

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ECLECTIC RANT: San Francisco Should Opt-in to the SB-1045 Conservatorship Pilot Program

By Ralph E. Stone : berkeleyplanet – excerpt

On September 27, 2018,California Governor Jerry Brown approved Senate Bill-1045 , which creates a five-year pilot program for San Francisco, Los Angeles, and San Diego Counties for a conservatorship program in the Welfare and Institutions Code.

Current conservatorship, the two sections of the Lanterman-Petris-Short Act and probate section provide a procedure to appoint a conservator for people who are “gravely disabled” as result of a serious mental health disorder or an impairment by chronic alcoholism.

SB-1045 expands the scope of conservatorships to allow housing with wraparound services to the most vulnerable Californians living on the streets. In order to be considered for conservatorship under SB-1045, an individual must be chronically homeless, suffering from serious mental illness and substance use disorder such that those co-occurring conditions have resulted in that individual frequently visiting the emergency room, being frequently detained by police under a Section 5150, or frequently held for psychiatric evaluation and treatment. In short, SB-1045’s aim is to make it easier to help troubled homeless deemed too impaired to care for themselves..(more)

Homeless San Diegans Lead National Fight of Vehicle-Camping Laws

: courthousenews – excerpt

SAN DIEGO (CN) – Homeless San Diegans living in RVs and cars have successfully challenged local laws outlawing vehicle habitation, with a judge ordering the city to cease ticketing and toss out hundreds of outstanding tickets. If they win their case – or a favorable settlement – their efforts could be emulated around the country.

This past fall, San Diegans living in RVs and vehicles kicked off their lawsuit with a rally in the city’s historic Balboa Park, singing and chanting while waving hand-painted signs which read “Stop the tickets.”

Represented by Disability Rights California, the plaintiffs in the case have disabilities and say living in their vehicles is the safest option for them absent affordable housing.

San Diego had just weathered a Hepatitis A outbreak that left 20 people dead and over 400 hospitalized. The public health crisis mostly impacted the city’s unsheltered population and its spread was compounded by the lack of public restrooms for those living on San Diego streets. The situation forced the city to sanitize downtown streets with a bleach solution and install portable toilets and hand washing stations… (more)

Mayor London Breed’s huge political fumble on Prop. C

By Joe Eskenazi : missionlocal – excerpt

San Francisco’s mayor could have confounded and neutralized the city’s political left for years by embracing homeless measure Prop. C. Instead, she isolated herself, rejecting it with specious arguments.

Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.

London Breed is the mayor, and you are not. We have “takes.” She makes “decisions.” The mayor’s decisions carry weight. They are tangible…

So, make no mistake: Breed’s firm rejection of homeless measure Proposition C — a choreographed Friday announcement coming in lockstep with Sen. Scott Wiener and Assemblyman David Chiu — was a crushing and credibility-destroying decision.

This was rendered even clearer by Monday’s splashy announcement from Marc Benioff, the city’s favored benevolent billionaire, that he was going all-in on supporting Prop. C. The measure’s backers had, previously, likened themselves to David battling the Downtown powers-that-be Goliath… (more)

There are better places to live and work that have nothing to do with Prop C and taxes. Businesses have soured on San Francisco for the same reason we all have. A high cost of living should at least guarantee a high quality of life and San Francisco is not delivering. We are poor has-been version of a once great city and no one seems to know how to pull us out of a race to the bottom, or if they do, they are being ignored.

RELATED:

New study says rent control doesn’t discourage new housing

USC researchers say the data shows that Prop. 10 wouldn’t stifle housing production. That’s a direct challenge to the real-estate industry campaign

By Tim Redmond : 48hills – excerpt

The landlord lobby – and it’s one of the most powerful interests in the state of California – is spending more than $40 million to convince voters not to support Prop. 10 – a measure that would allow (but not require) cities to impose effective rent controls…

The USC study, sponsored by the California Community Foundation, suggests that rent control tends to keep rents lower even in uncontrolled buildings, helps preserve housing and community stability – and has little discernable impact on the construction of new housing.

The study’s authors are not economists. The lead author, Manuel Pastor, is a sociologist. The two other authors, Vanessa Carter and Maya Abood, are urban planners.

But unlike the Stanford economists who put out a complex study on the economics of rent control, complete with equations that almost nobody can understand, the USC report looks at the existing literature on rent control… (more)

The market appears to be in a self-correction mood that could slow development regardless of how the outcome of Prop C and the repeal of Costa-Hawkins.

Judge Cites Newly Unsealed Video, Allows Mario Woods Suit to Go to Trial

: kqed – excerpt (includes media links)

Newly unsealed video of the 2015 San Francisco police shooting of Mario Woods casts doubt on officers’ statements about the deadly encounter, a federal judge said in a Tuesday ruling.

U.S. District Court Judge William Orrick ordered that a lawsuit by Woods’ mother can proceed to trial… (more)

Check the links to the audio and video tracks linked to the page above. Appropriately, the trial is scheduled for April 1, 2019.

 

SF supervisors on common ground for solving tough problems

Each of the 11 members of San Francisco’s Board of Supervisors has priorities for the fall legislative season, and they’re as varied as banning workplace cafeterias, restricting takeout containers and regulating 3-D-printed guns.But binding many supervisors’ agendas together is a common focus on problems that have long defied attempts to solve them — initiatives that seek to move more homeless people off the streets and create more affordable places for residents to live…

Five seats — Districts Two, Four, Six, Eight and 10 — will be contested in the November election. That means new members will need time to settle in and set their own priorities. And since board President Malia Cohen is termed out, there will be a new leader who can shake up committee assignments…

Here is some of what the supervisors said San Francisco residents can expect from them over the next few months:… (more)

Some of these issues are surprising. Read and send your comments to the supervisors that are working on your area of interest.

Flexible zoning is popular as a means to help ailing retailers. Kill them with high rents and parking removal, and then allow some discretion in zoning and uses. It may keep some of them alive for a while longer.

Safety issues are a major concern, but, fixing the problem seems elusive.

Navigation centers are popular temporary solutions, but we need permanent solutions. Homeless services and social services seem to be having problems as well.

Campaign finance is the oldest elephant that never goes away.

In-home care should be easy to get done as it doesn’t add to the housing demand, but it does require a larger number of workers than we have now. Maybe Prop C could help finance some of the new hires.

Conservatorship is another elusive legal problem that seems to get held up.

Housing stability could be used to protect at risk landlords as well as tenants.

Cohen is holding an accountability hearing October 15, to investigate the who is responsible for paying for the cleanup at Hunters Point. We thought it was the Navy. I guess she isn’t sure now.

To add to our woes, the Chinese are no longer taking our waste so we much deal with that.

Landlords are threatening rent hikes if Proposition 10 passes, activists say

By : curbed – excerpt

The ballot measure would roll back state regulations on rent control

Prop10.jpg

In August, North Hollywood resident Jacob Swanson, 36, heard from his building’s property manager that rent for his apartment would increase from $1,850 to $2,000 per month, higher than the typical yearly increase he was used to.

Eager to know the reason for the higher rent hike, he emailed the property manager to ask if repairs or upgrades were planned for the building. The reply he received didn’t mention any repairs; instead, the building’s manager blamed the increase on “the upcoming election.”

Renter advocates say Los Angeles landlords and building managers are hitting tenants with rent hikes in advance of November, when voters will decide on Proposition 10, a statewide ballot initiative that would lift restrictions on rent control in California cities… (more)

If I had any doubts about how to vote on Prop 10, I now know that we don’t need to bow to intimidation  when we don’t have to. The entire world appears to have forgotten the last 100 years and be ready to repeat them. It is time to stand up for what principals we have left while we still have some.