Random Access – 3 Mayors Discuss Affordable Housing and Traffic Concerns

Video and comments By Sunnyvale City Council Member, Michael S. Goldman

A 15 minute round-table with: Mayor Lynette Lee Eng of Los Altos, Mayor Eric Filseth of Palo Alto, and Mayor Steven Scharf of Cupertino.

“City bankruptcies, deteriorating public services as funds are drained from cities trying to cope with increased demands by new construction. That will be CASA’s main impacts. See a transcript on Michael’s site: https://meetingthetwain.blogspot.com/2019/03/three-mayors-on-silicon-valley-housing.html

Thanks to these Mayors for their frank discussion on what many consider to be overlooked considerations that were not addressed adequately by the SF Bay Area regional planners who concocted the CASA Compact. Forcing more up-zoning on landfill that is sinking under the tall towers already built, is a losing proposition. How many people want to throw more money at the Joint Powers Authority that designed and built the closed, failing Transbay Terminal?

Revitalizing SF’s historic piers: Next step could start a fight

By Roland Li : sfchronicle – excerpt

The Port of San Francisco is planning to seek a developer to revitalize up to four historic piers and two other structures on the city’s northeast Embarcadero — but a longtime local activist is calling for a pause…

Jon Golinger, a longtime North Beach activist who has successfully fought previous projects at the same piers, wants to see an update to the Waterfront Land Use Plan before a request for proposals moves forward.

An updated plan was developed by the 32-member Waterfront Plan Working Group between 2015 and 2018. The update calls for water recreation, public waterfront access, parks and open space, along with higher revenue generators in pier sheds to help finance projects at the piers… (more)

FIX THE MESS FIRST and move slowly into the next big project on the bay. We have seen this movie before, and now that our governor is suing again, San Francisco should be very careful to follow the rules and be as transparent as possible over the development on the Bay.

It is being sold off at a pretty fast pace. There is a renewed push for costly dredging on Treasure Island in spite of a recent decision to kill that idea, and a renewed push to put in ferry lines that will further impact access to the Bay.
It is not a bad idea to pause while all these projects are melded into a solid plan. We only have one Bay and and we don’t need any more fast poorly executed projects while we are in the midst of fixing the host of disasters bought on by eager investors. Let’s get this right the first time please.

 

The Sierra Club and the luxury-housing developer

By Zelda Bronstein : 48hills – excerpt

Northern Alameda chapter backs San Leandro project in a sign that the pro-growth forces are trying to take over the environmental group.

Are you a Sierra Club member who lives in Berkeley, Albany, Emeryville, Alameda, Piedmont or San Leandro? If so, you fall under the aegis of the club’s Northern Alameda County Group, which is nested within the larger Bay Chapter.

Be aware, then, that the NAC Executive Committee is currently dominated by a pro-growth coterie that’s exploiting the Sierra Club’s cachet to push a pro-development agenda that violates the club’s commitments to affordable housing, neighborhood integrity, and democratic governance.

If you’re a Sierra Club member who lives elsewhere in the Bay Area, you should also be concerned. The growth boosters on the NAC Ex Com include two men who wield considerable influence in the Bay Chapter, Igor Tregub and Andy Katz. Tregub also chairs the chapter Executive Committee. Both he and Katz sit on the Bay Chapter’s Political Committee, which makes the Sierra Club’s endorsements of political candidates and ballot measures. In the Bay Area, where the club claims nearly 60,000 members, and environmental values are widely embraced, Sierra Club endorsements carry a lot of weight. (UPDATE: Tregub tells me he has stepped down from the Political Committee, which only makes advisory recommendations on endorsements.)

This is an alarming trend for the club; already in San Francisco, Yimbys have tried to take over the local chapter (and so far failed). But the pro-development forces know that placing people on the boards of all-volunteer organizations is not that difficult. There’s little doubt that “smart growth” advocates are trying to shift the influential Sierra Club in their direction, locally and nationally(more)

Takeaways From a Wide-Ranging State of the State

By Jill Cowen : nytimes – excerpt

When Gov. Gavin Newsom began his first State of the State address yesterday, political observers expected him to attack the Trump administration…

But instead, one of the most powerful politicians in the country quickly moved on from President Trump and took aim at the legacy of a fellow Democrat: Mr. Newsom’s predecessor, Jerry Brown.

“He dispatched Trump and Jerry Brown in very different ways,” said Raphael Sonenshein, the executive director of the Pat Brown Institute for Public Affairs at Cal State Los Angeles. “In Trump’s case, he dismissed him.”.

Mr. Newsom covered a lot of ground in his 43-minute address, from the graying of California to immigration to the blockchain.

So my colleague, Jennifer Medina, and I broke down some key takeaways. (We’ll explore more questions in future newsletters; the state is vast and complicated, after all.)… (more)

RELATED:

Link to Governor Newsom’s State of the State address:

 

Breed calls for public power study in wake of PG&E bankruptcy announcement

By Joshua Sabatini : sfexaminer – excerpt

Following the announcement that PG&E is filing for bankruptcy, Mayor London Breed assured residents Monday there will be no impacts to their power service and asked the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission to study possible responses — including transitioning to a public power system.

Options to be considered include buying the existing electrical infrastructure outright, according to city officials.

PG&E announced early Monday morning that it is filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, as the San Francisco-based utility company faces an estimated $30 billion liability for damages from deadly Northern California fires during the past two years… (more)

CASA Compact video clips

For all you out there who want to learn more and share details about the CASA Compact, here is the link to the page that should set you up with more than you need:

https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL_BuJGc-hEs6XaV9ys8Cg0utnt9mrnLt5

 

 

School officials, incoming supes want SF to spend windfall on teacher raises

By Jill Tucker, Trisha Thadani, Dominic Fracassa : sfchronicle – excerpt

All of a sudden, San Francisco has an extra $181 million to spend. It comes from excess education funds, and some officials hope that’s exactly how it will be spent: on education. Specifically, teacher pay raises.

So far, proposals at City Hall exclude using the money for schools, with Mayor London Breed pushing to fund homelessness initiatives. The Board of Supervisors’ three new, incoming members, however, say extra funding for schools will be a priority for them.

The windfall comes as the school district is facing a legal challenge to a new parcel tax that would raise $50 million annually, most of it for a teacher pay raise. School officials say that means they don’t have the expected funding to cover the 7 percent teacher pay hike. So, the windfall suddenly becomes a potential solution… (more)