School officials, incoming supes want SF to spend windfall on teacher raises

By Jill Tucker, Trisha Thadani, Dominic Fracassa : sfchronicle – excerpt

All of a sudden, San Francisco has an extra $181 million to spend. It comes from excess education funds, and some officials hope that’s exactly how it will be spent: on education. Specifically, teacher pay raises.

So far, proposals at City Hall exclude using the money for schools, with Mayor London Breed pushing to fund homelessness initiatives. The Board of Supervisors’ three new, incoming members, however, say extra funding for schools will be a priority for them.

The windfall comes as the school district is facing a legal challenge to a new parcel tax that would raise $50 million annually, most of it for a teacher pay raise. School officials say that means they don’t have the expected funding to cover the 7 percent teacher pay hike. So, the windfall suddenly becomes a potential solution… (more)

Guest opinion: ‘Local control’ isn’t perfect, but it’s better for everyone than unelected regional bureaucracies

By Susan Kirsch : bizjournals – excerpt

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Artist view of dense housing creeping into single family neighborhoods.

The Business Times recently put forward the view that “‘Local control’ of housing is the problem, not the solution” (Viewpoint section, Aug. 31 print edition).

It also reported that Livable California is forming coalitions with like-minded elected city officials and community leaders in neighborhood, homeowner, renter and social justice organizations across the state. The goal that brings us together is to strengthen local control, integrated with regional collaboration and partnerships, as the answer to housing solutions and long-term, sustainable communities.

Local control isn’t perfect, but among everyday people, it is preferable to top-down state mandates. It has a greater capacity to shape solutions than the stymied one-size-fits-all approach currently advocated by big business and Sacramento…

The crisis we face is the systematic effort to dismantle local control and replace it with unelected, regional bureaucracies.

The crisis is the rush to pass more draconian legislation, like the dozen or so housing bills passed in 2018, piled on top of the 14 housing bills passed in 2017, which Berkeley researchers warn have unpredictable outcomes.

The crisis is believing the mantra “we have to do something,” justifies legislation that benefits a few, while jeopardizing the majority.

The crisis is legislation that increases the financial burden on cities without calling it what it is — an unfunded mandate.

The crisis is the threat to demo- cracy… (more)

 

Inclusionary Zoning: Everything You Need to Know – CityLab

By Benjamin Schneider : citylab – excerpt

You’ve seen the term. But do you really know what it means? Here’s your essential primer.

If you’ve hung around the CityLab site, sat through a City Council meeting, or hobnobbed with a housing developer, you’ve probably run across the term “inclusionary zoning.” You might even think you know what it means. But wait, do you? Don’t worry. We’ve got you covered. Welcome to the pilot edition of “CityLab University,” a resource for understanding some of the most important concepts related to cities and urban policy. If you like this feature, have constructive feedback, or would like to see a similar explainer on other topics, drop us a line at editors@citylab.com (more)

 

Winds of change at Clipper Cove

By Hunter Cutting : sfexaminer – excerpt

The ascendancy of President Donald Trump has validated and normalized the politics of greed in Washington, D.C., while turning the White House into a strategic asset in the Trump business empire. And the effects appear to be rippling across the country, all the way to San Francisco. While San Francisco is no stranger to greed-driven political deals, the latest entrant to the political arena, a luxury mega-marina proposal by local political powerhouse Darius Anderson, is a stunningly audacious asset grab, one worthy of President Trump himself.

For his scheme, Anderson has targeted San Francisco’s largest and most-valuable open water cove. Clipper Cove lies next to the Bay Bridge, cradled between the arms of Treasure Island and Yerba Buena Island…

Unfortunately, the very qualities that make Clipper Cove a stellar attraction for small boat recreation also make it a prime location for a luxury marina…

Late last month, the Treasure Island Development Authority heard Anderson’s plan to demolish the existing small-boat marina in Clipper Cove and replace it with a sprawling luxury marina dedicated exclusively to very large yachts running 40 to 80 feet in length…(more)

Supervisors Propose Universal Child Care Ballot Measure

by Nathan Falstreau: hoodline – excerpt

n June 2018, San Franciscans may get to weigh in on a ballot initiative that would enact universal childcare for city residents.

At yesterday’s Board of Supervisors meeting, District 6 Supervisor Jane Kim joined District 7 Supervisor Norman Yee to advance the initiative. The two instructed the Controller’s office to analyze the proposal’s costs and benefits.

“Nationwide, 60 percent of households with children do not have a stay-at-home parent,” Kim said, noting that center-based childcare for an infant in many states costs more than tuition and fees at public universities. “With these stark realities, we know that we must do better.”

At the meeting, Kim said she plans to introduce an initiative that would fund and implement a program to ensure access to affordable child care, possibly modeled after a sales tax ballot measure Alameda County is floating…

Details about the proposed ballot initiative—and how much it would cost to fund the program—have not been solidified, nor was a revenue stream identified.

A representative from Yee’s office told Hoodline v email that “the details of the ballot initiative will be contingent on the findings of the Controller report that Supervisors Kim and Yee requested.”

“If we truly believe that families are the backbone of our city,” Kim explained, “and that we have to do all that we can to hold onto them and make this city a family-friendly city, we have to do better and we can.”… (more)