Homeless housing proposal near AT&T Park in San Francisco worries homeowners

kron4 – excerpt (includes video)

New buildings going up on Third Street near Giants Stadium photo by Zrants

SAN FRANCISCO (KRON) — A homeless housing proposal in San Francisco just blocks away from AT&T park has fired up homeowners in the area.

On Thursday night, residents held a meeting to tell city officials they do not want the complex up in their neighborhood.

Mission Bay homeowners are upset, saying they paid high prices to live there and shouldn’t have to worry about their safety if homeless people with mental health issues move into the area. They planned Thursday’s meeting that went on until 8:30 p.m.

It is a full house. Many people showed up to share their concerns about the proposed complex that would go up in a lot behind the police headquarters on China Basin Street…

OCII presenters also pointed out there are several projects just like this proposal already working well throughout the city.

They offer tours for people to see for themselves…(more)

This project must have been the best kept secret at City Hall. We personally checked with various city agencies using the information available to the public on the planning web site and spoke to people in the supervisor’s office, the Mayor’s office and non-profits working with the homeless, and no one claimed knowledge about this project. When we used the block number and asked specifically about this project. The only way we could access the plans was through the information the neighbors dug up. The “new” address is not listed by block number on the Planning Department property map. The only way you could find it was to type in the address. This 197 page RFP is what the neighbors had to go by. The address, 410 China Basin Street, brings up different information each time I try to access it.

Bay-Map.jpg

At some point I found a map that shows with Blocks 9 and 9A listed as 166 Affordable Units, under the OCII. This looks like an old map as Pierpoint Lane is no longer exists.

We have a real problem of communication at City Hall between departments and within the planning department.It is hard to believe that the people who are running the navigation centers don’t know about a project of this magnitude being planned for one of the hottest real estate markets in town, between two sports arenas, next to the newest public service centers with both police and fire departments on Third Street. There has been a lot of talk and discussion about the Navigation Centers and how there is no where for the homeless to go after their 30 day stay at the navigation centers. Here is a planned development project that may solve some of those issues that no one knew about until the neighbors demanded a hearing, or so it seems.

 

San Francisco cannot be run like this.

We need a much more robust communication system that requires more public debate and more involvement in the running of our city. Let’s start with a map of the projects they claim are working well throughout the city. Must we wait for a tour date? Where are they so we can examine them for ourselves?

 

City Hall needs to work on a new notification process.

Probably half of all complaints would be avoided if the citizens trusted the government to share their plans before millions of dollars are spent on projects residents don’t want or don’t want to pay for. Almost all complaints start with claims that there was no notification or proper notification regarding the project that is being opposed. We need to figure out a new notification process.

 

The reason people are upset with the Mayor and City Hall is not based on the facts, it is largely based on the lack of information and transparency. If we trusted City Hall to keep us informed, we might be more inclined to support what they are doing. Being lied to and kept in the dark is most irritating.

 

If anyone has any more information on this project, or knows what the process may be to move it forward, please let us know.

Plan Bay Area 2040 Draft Plan

If you are one of the unhappy San Francisco residents or a middle class citizen this plan will not please you.

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) will host an open house to receive comments regarding Plan Bay Area 2040.  The open house is Wednesday, May 17, 2017 between 6:30pm and 8:30pm at the MTC headquarters at 375 Beal Street ( about a 10 minute walk for Embarcadero Station). DRAFT PLAN LINK

The Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) is now available; comment on the DEIR and the Draft Plan through June 1.

Some statistics include:
*  501,000 jobs added between 2011 and 2015
*  65,000 housing units built between 2011 and 2015
*  Regionally 1 house built for every 8 jobs created.

HOUSING
Where will the region plan for the 820,000 new households forecasted between 2010 and 2040.  Regionally by 2040, 3.4 million households are forecasted. 46% will be in the “Big 3 Cities”  — SF, Oakland, San Jose.

JOBS
1.3 million new jobs  (36% in the Big  3 Cities)

So what does it all mean?  Climate Change, Housing costs and displacement, Economic Development and Environmental Impact and Transportation.

A question raised at a recent MTC committee meeting was: Should cities seeking economic development take responsibility for housing?  (Think the Menlo Park Facebook Expansion).  The local Menlo Park approval for 6,000 more jobs has regional impact.

No mention of a Public Regional Express Bus System to move the population.   More Private Commuter buses operating on your residential street?

Draft Plan and Draft EIR at Plan Bay Area 2040 Draft Plan

RELATED:

It’s not surprising that President Donald Trump’s proposed tax plan would hollow out the middle class. Income tax reductions will be robust for corporations and those in the highest income brackets. Others won’t fare so well.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren warns of the demise of the middle class in her book, “This Fight is Our Fight: The Battle to Save America’s Middle Class.” She writes about growing up in the 1950s, when minimum wage supported a family of four. In 2017, minimum wage can’t support a household of two.

But hold on a minute before simply bashing Trump. Are you surprised that progressive California Democrats are implementing strategies that increase economic inequality?…

Now Plan Bay Area 2040’s “Regional Forecast of Jobs, Population and Housing” shows the rich and the poor growing to the highest numbers, but not the middle. The historic bell-shaped curve is inverted…

The plan forecasts: “The ‘hollowing out’ of the middle is projected to continue over the next 25 years. Household growth will be strongest in the highest income category, reflecting the expected strength of growth in high-wage sectors combined with non-wage income — interest, dividends, capital gains, transfers.”…

Further: “Household growth will also be high in the lowest-wage category, reflecting occupational shifts, wages stagnation, as well as the retirement of seniors without pension assets.”…(more)

 

Longtime San Francisco residents unhappy with city, says poll

by : curbed – excerpt

SF-skyline

San Francisco’s view-killing wall on the waterfront seen from the bay is unpopular with many long-term residents – photo by Zrants

The longer you’ve been living in San Francisco, the less likely you are to be happy with it.

That’s one of the lessons from the 2017 San Francisco City Survey released Tuesday, in which those with more than 30 years of San Francisco living under their belts generally gave City Hall a thumbs down.

The controller’s office conducts the survey every two years to measure general satisfaction with public services.

Overall, public opinion seems fairly mellow this time; most of the 2,166 randomly selected phone respondents gave the city either a B or a B- grade on things like public safety, transit, and parks. Libraries got a B+.

The public ranked homelessness as the city’s biggest problem, with 33 percent of responses highlighting it as their top concern… (more)

What is to like about a city that sold its soul for a few buckets of gold. People used to come for art, culture, social equality and other non-material qualities of life because there was no money. The new San Francisco draws get-rich-quick schemers who believe their virtual reality and future vision is more important than anyone or anything else and can’t wait to kick us out of our homes.

 

Tables Turned: High-Paid Techies Priced Out Of Silicon Valley

by CBS : youtube – excerpt (video included)

Too much money is not working out well for any of the workers, included the techies. Around 40% are not planning to stay in the Bay Area for long. Who will live in the city when the workers leave? Who will be paying high rents when robots replace them?

How to prevent fraudulent owner move-in evictions

By Tim Redmond : 48hills – excerpt

The San Francisco supes start discussing fraudulent owner-move-in evictions Friday, and local tenant groups are asking that both of the bills coming to the committee be amended to include more effective protections for renters.

Sup. Mark Farrell has an OMI bill. So do Sups. Jane Kim and Aaron Peskin. The Government Audit and Oversight Committee will hold a hearing starting at 10 am on eviction enforcement, and tenant advocates plan to be there in numbers…

The two bills are aimed at addressing what everyone agrees is a serious problem: Landlords are getting rid of rent-controlled tenants by arguing that they want to move in (or let a close relative move in) to the apartment. That’s legal, for the most part – the owner of a building has the right to live in their property.

But in hundreds of instances every year, the landlord tosses out the tenant, waits a few months, and then rents the place out to someone else at a much higher price.

And there’s no easy way to stop that…

This is one of the major tenant issues of the year. The bills won’t actually come out of tomorrow’s hearing; they will be heard at a later point. But we will see the beginnings of the debate shape up… (more)

 

The Agenda, April 24 -39: Real health-care reform!

Tim Redmond : 48hills – excerpt

Plus: Affordable housing, evictions, Airbnb …. and the Leaning Tower of Soma. It’s going to be a busy week

A measure that would transform health care in California and set the stage for a profound change nationwide comes before its first committee Wednesday/26.

SB 562, by Sens. Ricardo Lara and Tony Atkins, could be the most important piece of legislation in the state this year…

The California Nurses Association is leading the fight, and will be holding a rally and march to the state Capitol starting at 11 am. The hearing is at 1:30. Buses will leave San Francisco at 7:50 am, one from the Zoo and one from Civic Center; you can RSVP here

The heated battle over affordable housing in SF is back at the Planning Commission Thursday/27, and it’s pretty clear that the deck has been stacked in favor of the plan favored by Sups. Ahsha Safai and London Breed – and the developers…

It’s going to be a crazy busy day at the Supes Government Audit and Oversight Committee Friday/28

irst, Sup. Jane Kim has called for a hearing on the city’s enforcement practices around residential evictions. That’s going to play into her move to ensure more accountability for landlords who do fake owner-move-in evictions – and may be the start of a discussion around the need for more enforcement authority and inspectors at the Rent Board.

Next: Sup. Aaron Peskin wants to look into the funding and oversight of the Fine Arts Museums of San Francisco – which will no doubt bring up some of the issues around former DeYoung honcho Dede Wilsey, whose tenure was marked by all sorts of issues.

Then we are back to the Leaning Tower of Soma, and Peskin’s ongoing efforts to figure out why the city approved and a developer constructed a giant luxury housing tower that is now sinking and keeling over to the side…(more)

One fix for affordable housing: Close a loophole with AB 915

By Fernando Martí and Peter Cohen : sfexaminer – excerpt

As is often said, there is no “silver bullet” to solve the affordable housing crisis. But there is at least one easy fix to a current problem.

Last December, we wrote about the gift that Santa brought to San Francisco developers: a state density bonus that effectively cuts the affordable housing requirements for development projects — while giving them a substantial 35 percent bonus in market-rate units.

The good news is that San Francisco Assemblymember Phil Ting has set out to correct that this year with Assembly Bill 915, legislation that will make sure underlying affordable housing requirements apply evenly to all development projects, whether they use the state bonus or not…

If you want to let Assemblymember Ting know you support AB 915 for state density bonus affordability, call his office at (916) 319-2019 or send him an email at assemblymember.ting@assembly.ca.gov… (more)