BARF! Density-loving Sonja Trauss is running for District 6 supervisor

By joe fitzgerald rodriguez : sfexaminer – excerpt

A lot of interesting headlines come to mind with this announcement

BARF — it’s not just a gross-out verb, anymore. It’s a movement.

The San Francisco Bay Area Renters Federation has (ahem) induced headlines from the New York Times to The Atlantic, all while clashing mightily with neighborhood groups here at home, as the group encourages city officials to build, build, build.

Now, the pro-density movement is shifting from advocacy to realpolitik:

BARF leader Sonja Trauss is running for supervisor. She filed to run July 5, according to the Department of Elections, though the race isn’t until November 2018…

Oddly, she’s running to represent what are among the most housing-dense neighborhoods in San Francisco: District 6, which includes South of Market and the Tenderloin.

They’ve got apartments sprouting out their ears. So what good is her running?…

“Trauss really stuck her foot in her mouth last year, when she argued in a public meeting that resistance against tech workers gentrifying San Francisco is akin to racism against Latino immigrants”…

(more)

For starters, she likely to promote more tech disruptions in the city. Developers want to promote more Airbnb, Ubers, and Lyfts and Scoots and other, anti-human robotic corporations that will not only make life. Now they are all going to take the money and invest in real estate, the real winner in this game of Grab-and-Go politics.

Google and Facebook are already announcing they are building small cities in the Peninsula. They used to call them “company towns.” When the air goes out of the unicorn startup balloons, they will be sitting on a lot of prime real estate. It is called diversification and the techies are fast at work diversifying by becoming real estate magnates.

The BARFers are the forefront of the next wave of takeovers coming to the Bay Area. Good news is we have some time to get out the story to stop the movement. As Joe points out, Trauss has already discredited herself among most of the affordable housing advocates and especially in District Six, where the residents are already up in arms over the changes they are dealing with and the new population of homeless at their feet.

None of the city’s programs have brought the number of homeless down yet.

 

 

Parking-space spat may halt $400 million tower

By J.K. Dineen : sfchronicle – excerpt

Van Ness and Market is the location of the One Oak Street Project. This intersection is known for its powerful winds that sweep through the wide intersection. Photos by google.

The tower proposed for the northwest corner of Market Street and Van Ness Avenue is big and bold in every respect. It would rise 40 stories. It would cost more than $400 million to build. It would bring a European-style piazza, an expansive restaurant with 30-foot glass walls and 304 luxury condos to one of the city’s busiest crossroads…

In the case of the One Oak Street tower, which goes before the Planning Commission on Thursday for approvals, the Hayes Valley Neighborhood Association is pushing the developer to trim the number of parking spaces by 60 spots, from 136 to 76. This would represent a reduction from .45 to .25 parking spaces per unit, or from nearly 1 for every 2 to 1 for 4…

“It’s a marketing tool,” Yarne said. “Nobody, myself included, expects people in this building to be driving everywhere. We don’t. But the marketing professionals will tell you until the cows come home that people want the option.”…

“We are in challenging times in San Francisco because construction costs are high and sales prices have flattened,” Yarne said…

If the Planning Department approves the development, it goes to the Board of Supervisors’ Land Use and Transportation Committee in July and later to the full board for final approval… (more)

The more famous SF becomes for being a parking nightmare the more people will demand parking, but this project sounds like it has more than just parking issues. The idea that the public space will be cleaner and more well-kept than most is the real page turner since this is ground zero for the needle brigade. Stay tuned…

After a short deliberation the Planning Commissioners approved the higher number of parking spaces. Commissioner Hillis said that he know of only one family in his childrens’ school that did not own a car. One assumes that his is not that family. AS they voted to approve the project the Commissions admitted that some day condos may be built without parking spaces but that day has not yet come. One need only look at the numbers of requests for parking to verify that is true.

Sanctuary City for Housing Developers: Pitting Neighbor Against Neighbor for Affordable Housing

Patrick Monette Shaw – excerpt

New article is now available on-line at www.stopLHHdownsize.com. A printer-friendly article is attached. Hyperlinks to various supporting background files and media articles are only available via the web site.

The Sudden “Deal” Struck for Inclusionary Housing (Two Days Later on May 17, 2017)

The dueling proposals for Inclusionary Housing amendments between Supervisors Peskin and Kim vs. Supervisors Safai, Breed, and Tang purportedly reached a “deal” on Wednesday, May 17 that was reported in the San Francisco Examiner on Friday, May 19. Unfortunately, the actual “compromise” legislation was not posted to the Board of Supervisors web site in advance of its Land Use Committee hearing on Monday May 22, and the details were released just today, too late for inclusion in this article. The Land Use Committee will consider the single, compromise deal on June 5… (more)

Homeless housing proposal near AT&T Park in San Francisco worries homeowners

kron4 – excerpt (includes video)

New buildings going up on Third Street near Giants Stadium photo by Zrants

SAN FRANCISCO (KRON) — A homeless housing proposal in San Francisco just blocks away from AT&T park has fired up homeowners in the area.

On Thursday night, residents held a meeting to tell city officials they do not want the complex up in their neighborhood.

Mission Bay homeowners are upset, saying they paid high prices to live there and shouldn’t have to worry about their safety if homeless people with mental health issues move into the area. They planned Thursday’s meeting that went on until 8:30 p.m.

It is a full house. Many people showed up to share their concerns about the proposed complex that would go up in a lot behind the police headquarters on China Basin Street…

OCII presenters also pointed out there are several projects just like this proposal already working well throughout the city.

They offer tours for people to see for themselves…(more)

This project must have been the best kept secret at City Hall. We personally checked with various city agencies using the information available to the public on the planning web site and spoke to people in the supervisor’s office, the Mayor’s office and non-profits working with the homeless, and no one claimed knowledge about this project. When we used the block number and asked specifically about this project. The only way we could access the plans was through the information the neighbors dug up. The “new” address is not listed by block number on the Planning Department property map. The only way you could find it was to type in the address. This 197 page RFP is what the neighbors had to go by. The address, 410 China Basin Street, brings up different information each time I try to access it.

Bay-Map.jpg

At some point I found a map that shows with Blocks 9 and 9A listed as 166 Affordable Units, under the OCII. This looks like an old map as Pierpoint Lane is no longer exists.

We have a real problem of communication at City Hall between departments and within the planning department.It is hard to believe that the people who are running the navigation centers don’t know about a project of this magnitude being planned for one of the hottest real estate markets in town, between two sports arenas, next to the newest public service centers with both police and fire departments on Third Street. There has been a lot of talk and discussion about the Navigation Centers and how there is no where for the homeless to go after their 30 day stay at the navigation centers. Here is a planned development project that may solve some of those issues that no one knew about until the neighbors demanded a hearing, or so it seems.

 

San Francisco cannot be run like this.

We need a much more robust communication system that requires more public debate and more involvement in the running of our city. Let’s start with a map of the projects they claim are working well throughout the city. Must we wait for a tour date? Where are they so we can examine them for ourselves?

 

City Hall needs to work on a new notification process.

Probably half of all complaints would be avoided if the citizens trusted the government to share their plans before millions of dollars are spent on projects residents don’t want or don’t want to pay for. Almost all complaints start with claims that there was no notification or proper notification regarding the project that is being opposed. We need to figure out a new notification process.

 

The reason people are upset with the Mayor and City Hall is not based on the facts, it is largely based on the lack of information and transparency. If we trusted City Hall to keep us informed, we might be more inclined to support what they are doing. Being lied to and kept in the dark is most irritating.

 

If anyone has any more information on this project, or knows what the process may be to move it forward, please let us know.

Plan Bay Area 2040 Draft Plan

If you are one of the unhappy San Francisco residents or a middle class citizen this plan will not please you.

The Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) will host an open house to receive comments regarding Plan Bay Area 2040.  The open house is Wednesday, May 17, 2017 between 6:30pm and 8:30pm at the MTC headquarters at 375 Beal Street ( about a 10 minute walk for Embarcadero Station). DRAFT PLAN LINK

The Draft Environmental Impact Report (DEIR) is now available; comment on the DEIR and the Draft Plan through June 1.

Some statistics include:
*  501,000 jobs added between 2011 and 2015
*  65,000 housing units built between 2011 and 2015
*  Regionally 1 house built for every 8 jobs created.

HOUSING
Where will the region plan for the 820,000 new households forecasted between 2010 and 2040.  Regionally by 2040, 3.4 million households are forecasted. 46% will be in the “Big 3 Cities”  — SF, Oakland, San Jose.

JOBS
1.3 million new jobs  (36% in the Big  3 Cities)

So what does it all mean?  Climate Change, Housing costs and displacement, Economic Development and Environmental Impact and Transportation.

A question raised at a recent MTC committee meeting was: Should cities seeking economic development take responsibility for housing?  (Think the Menlo Park Facebook Expansion).  The local Menlo Park approval for 6,000 more jobs has regional impact.

No mention of a Public Regional Express Bus System to move the population.   More Private Commuter buses operating on your residential street?

Draft Plan and Draft EIR at Plan Bay Area 2040 Draft Plan

RELATED:

It’s not surprising that President Donald Trump’s proposed tax plan would hollow out the middle class. Income tax reductions will be robust for corporations and those in the highest income brackets. Others won’t fare so well.

Massachusetts Sen. Elizabeth Warren warns of the demise of the middle class in her book, “This Fight is Our Fight: The Battle to Save America’s Middle Class.” She writes about growing up in the 1950s, when minimum wage supported a family of four. In 2017, minimum wage can’t support a household of two.

But hold on a minute before simply bashing Trump. Are you surprised that progressive California Democrats are implementing strategies that increase economic inequality?…

Now Plan Bay Area 2040’s “Regional Forecast of Jobs, Population and Housing” shows the rich and the poor growing to the highest numbers, but not the middle. The historic bell-shaped curve is inverted…

The plan forecasts: “The ‘hollowing out’ of the middle is projected to continue over the next 25 years. Household growth will be strongest in the highest income category, reflecting the expected strength of growth in high-wage sectors combined with non-wage income — interest, dividends, capital gains, transfers.”…

Further: “Household growth will also be high in the lowest-wage category, reflecting occupational shifts, wages stagnation, as well as the retirement of seniors without pension assets.”…(more)

 

Longtime San Francisco residents unhappy with city, says poll

by : curbed – excerpt

SF-skyline

San Francisco’s view-killing wall on the waterfront seen from the bay is unpopular with many long-term residents – photo by Zrants

The longer you’ve been living in San Francisco, the less likely you are to be happy with it.

That’s one of the lessons from the 2017 San Francisco City Survey released Tuesday, in which those with more than 30 years of San Francisco living under their belts generally gave City Hall a thumbs down.

The controller’s office conducts the survey every two years to measure general satisfaction with public services.

Overall, public opinion seems fairly mellow this time; most of the 2,166 randomly selected phone respondents gave the city either a B or a B- grade on things like public safety, transit, and parks. Libraries got a B+.

The public ranked homelessness as the city’s biggest problem, with 33 percent of responses highlighting it as their top concern… (more)

What is to like about a city that sold its soul for a few buckets of gold. People used to come for art, culture, social equality and other non-material qualities of life because there was no money. The new San Francisco draws get-rich-quick schemers who believe their virtual reality and future vision is more important than anyone or anything else and can’t wait to kick us out of our homes.

 

Tables Turned: High-Paid Techies Priced Out Of Silicon Valley

by CBS : youtube – excerpt (video included)

Too much money is not working out well for any of the workers, included the techies. Around 40% are not planning to stay in the Bay Area for long. Who will live in the city when the workers leave? Who will be paying high rents when robots replace them?