Breed calls for public power study in wake of PG&E bankruptcy announcement

By Joshua Sabatini : sfexaminer – excerpt

Following the announcement that PG&E is filing for bankruptcy, Mayor London Breed assured residents Monday there will be no impacts to their power service and asked the San Francisco Public Utilities Commission to study possible responses — including transitioning to a public power system.

Options to be considered include buying the existing electrical infrastructure outright, according to city officials.

PG&E announced early Monday morning that it is filing for Chapter 11 bankruptcy, as the San Francisco-based utility company faces an estimated $30 billion liability for damages from deadly Northern California fires during the past two years… (more)

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Breed asks for spending cuts up to 6 percent over the next two years

By Joshua Sabattini : sfexaminer – excerpt

Mayor London Breed has asked city departments to submit plans to cut spending by up to 6 percent over the next two years to help close The City’s projected budget deficit.

Government spending is outpacing revenue growth, resulting in a projected $107.4 million budget deficit in the next fiscal year beginning July 1, and $163.4 million in the following fiscal year.

In five years, the deficit is expected to exceed $640 million. The City plans to release its five-year financial plan later this week.

To view the Five-Year Financial Plan released Friday click here... (more)

Mayor London Breed’s huge political fumble on Prop. C

By Joe Eskenazi : missionlocal – excerpt

San Francisco’s mayor could have confounded and neutralized the city’s political left for years by embracing homeless measure Prop. C. Instead, she isolated herself, rejecting it with specious arguments.

Uneasy lies the head that wears a crown.

London Breed is the mayor, and you are not. We have “takes.” She makes “decisions.” The mayor’s decisions carry weight. They are tangible…

So, make no mistake: Breed’s firm rejection of homeless measure Proposition C — a choreographed Friday announcement coming in lockstep with Sen. Scott Wiener and Assemblyman David Chiu — was a crushing and credibility-destroying decision.

This was rendered even clearer by Monday’s splashy announcement from Marc Benioff, the city’s favored benevolent billionaire, that he was going all-in on supporting Prop. C. The measure’s backers had, previously, likened themselves to David battling the Downtown powers-that-be Goliath… (more)

There are better places to live and work that have nothing to do with Prop C and taxes. Businesses have soured on San Francisco for the same reason we all have. A high cost of living should at least guarantee a high quality of life and San Francisco is not delivering. We are poor has-been version of a once great city and no one seems to know how to pull us out of a race to the bottom, or if they do, they are being ignored.

RELATED:

New study says rent control doesn’t discourage new housing

USC researchers say the data shows that Prop. 10 wouldn’t stifle housing production. That’s a direct challenge to the real-estate industry campaign

By Tim Redmond : 48hills – excerpt

The landlord lobby – and it’s one of the most powerful interests in the state of California – is spending more than $40 million to convince voters not to support Prop. 10 – a measure that would allow (but not require) cities to impose effective rent controls…

The USC study, sponsored by the California Community Foundation, suggests that rent control tends to keep rents lower even in uncontrolled buildings, helps preserve housing and community stability – and has little discernable impact on the construction of new housing.

The study’s authors are not economists. The lead author, Manuel Pastor, is a sociologist. The two other authors, Vanessa Carter and Maya Abood, are urban planners.

But unlike the Stanford economists who put out a complex study on the economics of rent control, complete with equations that almost nobody can understand, the USC report looks at the existing literature on rent control… (more)

The market appears to be in a self-correction mood that could slow development regardless of how the outcome of Prop C and the repeal of Costa-Hawkins.

Breed calls for increased services, street cleaning in walk through SOMA

By Joshua Sabatini : sfexaminer – excerpt

Mayor London Breed on Thursday said she wants more engagement with homeless people on the street and greater frequency in power washing sidewalks, and reiterated her commitment to opening a safe injection site…

She said that she would like to see regular engagement with those living on the streets by city officials, such as members of the Homeless Outreach Team. “I envision them walking on the streets and being out here where we know there are people who are homeless. We should be out there every day, ‘What can I do to help you? What can I do to help you? What can I do to help you?’ Till the point where they are like: ‘Fine you can help me,’” Breed told the Examiner…

Breed is a proponent of opening safe injection sites to reduce syringe litter and help steer drug users into treatment, but since heroin and other intravenous drugs are against federal law, The City is wary of the legal ramifications. Breed, however, said she is committed to figuring out a way to make it work.

“I am going to aggressively push to try to get it done this year,” Breed said.

When asked about why the delay, she said, “I am trying to open one. I wish we can open one yesterday. But I also have to be responsible in the approach.” She said she wanted The City to be prepared for any “fall out” and for those “putting their lives on the line to work at these facilities, I don’t want them in jail. I have to make sure that I am responsible in my approach.”… (more)

Looks like our Mayor is concerned about both state and federal laws. That could put a damper on injection sites for a while, even though many support them. Perhaps the medical community could come to the rescue or the rules and regulations re: methadone could be altered to make it easier to procure for those who want it.

SF Mayor-elect Breed names former Supervisor Sean Elsbernd chief of staff

by  : sfgate – excerpt

San Francisco Mayor-elect London Breed announced Monday that she’s tapped former Supervisor Sean Elsbernd to be her chief of staff as she begins her transition to the mayor’s office.

Elsbernd now serves as U.S. Sen. Diane Feinstein’s state director, but will move into Breed’s administration after the Nov. 6 election. Elsbernd previously represented District Seven on the board of supervisors. Elsbernd is also an attorney and a former senior staffer for then-Mayor Gavin Newsom.

The announcement marks the first major appointment of Breed’s incoming administration… (more)

A number of budget items are discussed in the article.

Breed moves to undermine new board majority

By Tim Redmond : 48hills – excerpt

She is stepping down steps as board president (but not supervisor) to help the old moderate majority pick her successor — just days before a new D8 supe is sworn in.

The talk around the Board of Supervisors is that Mayor-Elect London Breed may step down from her post as board president (but not from her seat on the board) in the next week or two, so that the current board, with a six-vote moderate majority, can choose the next board president.

UPDATE: The Chron now confirms what I have heard and reports that Breed will in fact step down from that job “to focus on the transition” to the Mayor’s Office…

There are five solid votes for whatever and whoever Breed wants. There are five progressive votes for an alternative.

And it’s going to happen next week… (more)